Is your practice as profitable as you think?

Is your practice as profitable as you think?

Find out how to identify your practice's profitability level and take steps to correct it—before you're ready to sell.
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Aug 17, 2010

In this seven-part video series, Dr. Karen Felsted discusses why practice profitability is so important, how you can calculate it, and what you can do to increase your profitability level. In Chapter 1, you’ll learn:
• What is practice profitability?
• Why is it such a big deal?
• What does it mean to be a No-Lo Practice?

Speaker: Karen E. Felsted, CPA, MS, DVM, CVPM, the CEO of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues

Want to test your knowledge? Take the dvm360 BizQuiz: Do you know enough about your practice's profitability and value?

The full series
Chapter 1: Is your practice as profitable as you think?
Chapter 2: What is the buyer buying?
Chapter 3: How can I determine my practice’s true profitability?
Chapter 4: What common items must be adjusted?
Chapter 5: What’s a good level of profitability?
Chapter 6: What resources can help me calculate profitability?
Chapter 7: Think you might have a No-Lo Practice?
BizQuiz: Do you know enough about your practice's profitability and value?

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