Women gain on men when it comes to earning bachelor's degrees

Women gain on men when it comes to earning bachelor's degrees

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Feb 28, 2008
By dvm360.com staff

Women are gaining on men when it comes to finishing college, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. While the percentage of men age 25 or older with at least a bachelor's degree has held steady at 30 percent and is still greater than women (28 percent), women in the same group gained a percentage point in 2006 and 2007.

Young women, however, have passed the men. In the 25 to 29 age group, roughly 33 percent of women earned at least a bachelor's degree in 2007, compared with just 26 percent of men. Higher education for all genders, of course, continues to pay off. Workers 18 or older with a master's, professional, or doctoral degree earned an average of $82,320 in 2006, compared to $20,873 for those without a high school diploma.

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