When bickering gets out of hand

When bickering gets out of hand

source-image
Jan 01, 2013
By dvm360.com staff

My teams are starting to snip at each other. How do I stop it?

Drama, pettiness and arguing don't stop at adolescence, but work is the wrong place to let the cattiness creep in. Shawn McVey, MA, MSW, owner of McVey Management Solutions in Chicago and a Veterinary Economics board member, says most workplace disputes are a result of confusion about policy or procedure, so make sure your policies are clear and don't allow for ambiguity in the "how" of the job.

"If tensions are high and team members are blaming the other, then the manager needs to intervene and create a private time and place where people can cool down, make amends, and re-engage constructively," McVey says.

When things are muddied by emotions, it's helpful to say something like, "Let's address the emotions before we get to the substance of the issue. We have to work through the feelings before we can solve the problem."

And be sure to jump in at the first sign of employee bickering, McVey says, so these conflicts don't rule your hospital environment.

Hot topics on dvm360

Vetcetera: The complex topic of canine fear-related aggression

A guided tour of resources for addressing this popular and complicated subject, featuring advice from Dr. John Ciribassi.

Reality TV and the veterinarian: Discussing mainstream dog training advice with clients

Your clients may be getting behavior advice from cable TV. Get your opinion in the mix.

Blog: Election results pose obstacles for veterinary prescription law

Flip in U.S. Senate's majority may slow progress of Fairness to Pet Owners Act.

The war between shelters, veterinarians needs to end

Despite practitioners’ legitimate gripes, they’re hurting themselves.

7 steps to a better relationship between veterinarians and rescue groups

A DVM in the city shares his advice to veterinary practices for working with rescues.