What's in your wallet: Trends in veterinary salaries

What's in your wallet: Trends in veterinary salaries

In this economy of ups and downs, see how your paycheck compares to that of your fellow veterinarians around the nation.
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Aug 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

Does it pay to work in the veterinary profession? Check out the chart at left and see for yourself. According to new data from the 2011 Veterinary Economics Business Issues Survey, nearly 20 percent of respondents earned between $60,000 and $79,999 in 2010. “Those owners and associates who reported making less than $60,000 are likely to be working less than a full-time schedule,” says Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member Gary Glassman, CPA, a partner with Burzenski & Co. in East Haven, Conn.

Glassman explains that respondents who are making $120,000 and above are more likely to be active veterinary practice owners. “If your income is more than $120,000 per year, you may be a specialist working in small animal medicine. Or you might be an excellent producer of veterinary revenue,” Glassman says.

More in this package:
What is your veterinary income?
What is your veterinary income by region?

Also, keep in mind that some of these respondents live in areas where the cost of living is high and their paycheck compensates for this issue. For example, the majority of respondents who reported a veterinary-related income of $180,000 to $200,000 in 2010 live in the Southwest region of the United States—which includes high-priced California and Hawaii.

More in this package:
What is your veterinary income?
What is your veterinary income by region?

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