Walk-in vaccine clinic

Walk-in vaccine clinic

A walk-in vaccination clinic on even-numbered wednesdays helps this practice battle a bad economy and serve patients.
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Apr 01, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

Our local economy in Indiana is suffering right now, so we've started a new service: walk-in vaccinations on even-numbered Wednesdays. On these days the doctor performs brief physical exams and administers vaccinations at local vaccine-clinic prices. There is no extended consultation, and no questions are answered—just like a vaccine clinic.

We advertise the service on our lighted sign outside and in the local newspapers. We find that most of the pet owners taking advantage of this offer haven't been into a veterinary clinic for several years or have recently lost their jobs and can't afford to bring in the pet for its vaccinations at a routine wellness visit.

When they stop in, we ask them to prepay for the vaccination and then wait for a doctor to become available. Everyone seems to appreciate our efforts to address the current economic conditions, and several of these pet owners have later come in to treat their pets' illnesses or for routine surgeries. I see it as a win-win situation for us and clients.

—Dr. Fred Philips, owner; Animal Hospital of Centerville, Centerville, Ind.

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