Videotaping permission form

Videotaping permission form

Oct 01, 2010

Chances are, you'll have to do some explaining to team members when you first start talk of videotaping exam room sessions.. When I first set this process up in a practice, I make sure everyone in the office knows what I’m doing and why. I don’t intend to catch someone doing something wrong. In fact, quite the opposite: I intend to help team members enhance their communication abilities and exam room effectiveness.

I inform all employees that the room is under video surveillance and ask each to sign a release form. I also post a sign in the exam room informing clients that the room is under video surveillance. I normally review the videos with doctors and employees one on one. If I find an exceptionally good video, I ask permission of those involved to show it to the rest of the team.

An interesting phenomenon occurs in practices when I initiate videotaping. At first, employees are a little resistant and can be, shall I say, uptight. But once they've been through a round or two of reviews, they see the immense value of this exercise and ask to be recorded and evaluated again. They look forward to seeing their own improvement in exam room communication.

To download an employee consent form, click here.

To download the client notice, click here.

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