Vets vs. the Net: What you can do that veterinary websites can't

Vets vs. the Net: What you can do that veterinary websites can't

No website expresses empathy for a sick and dying pet. No website puts a hand on a client's shoulder.
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Feb 01, 2011

Pet owners are increasingly turning to the Internet for information and treatment plans—which can lead them to make catastrophic mistakes and put things off until it's too late. One of the biggest mountains we face today is the increasing allure of fast answers on the Web. More important is the personal touch lost online.

No website expresses empathy for a sick or dying pet. No website puts a hand on a client's shoulder. No website can offer an anxious pet a treat. In the battle of veterinarian vs. Internet, we must be on the attack. It means beating the drum of the human-animal bond. You can't get much more relevant than being a protector of the soul.

This primal relationship of pet owner to animal is the heart of your calling: See it, feel it, hear it. Say to yourself, "This is my most important examination of the day." Days don't count; hours don't count. Moments count. When you're picking your way off the edge of a cliff, you can't take a single step for granted. Not one.

Dr. Becker will discuss this topic in depth on May 7 at the CVC in Washington, D.C. Visit http://thecvc.com/ to register.

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