Veterinary team members rate their boss

Veterinary team members rate their boss

About 50 percent say the practice owner or manager is a good boss or the best boss they've ever worked for.
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Jul 10, 2008
By dvm360.com staff

Owners and practice managers, have you ever wanted to listen in on the gossip in the break room to see what your employees really think of you? Then you'll want to learn the results from the latest vetmedteam.com survey. Veterinary team members—82 percent of whom said they work for the practice owner or the practice manager—answered questions about their feelings toward their bosses. The good news: About half said their current boss is good or the best manager they've ever worked for.

They like you. They really, really like you: Eighty-three percent of team members said so. Two-thirds said that if they were in charge of hiring, they'd hire their boss. And 43 percent would follow their boss to another practice. According to respondents, the top five traits of these loved managers were fairness, an even temper, good listening skills, thoughtfulness, and a cheerful attitude.

Team members were unanimous about only one question on the survey. The full 100 percent of respondents said, yes, they are good employees.

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