Veterinary Economics' May content is now online

Veterinary Economics' May content is now online

Give your parasite protocols an extreme makeover, peek under the hood of pet insurance, learn when it's time for your manager to go, and more.
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May 18, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
Our May 2009 issue is online, and we kick it off with a no-holds-barred look at parasite prevention. There's no more reasons for lax protocols, poor client compliance, or a weak team effort at explaining to clients the importance of parasite prevention. Click here to read "Extreme makeover: Parasite edition."

If you're puzzled by pet insurance, check out managing editor Amanda Bertholf's in-depth feature "Focusing on pet insurance: the myths and truths."

And don't miss Hospital Management Editor Mark Opperman's feature about knowing when to fire your practice manager—and how to do it. Click here to read "Know when your manager is toast."

We have plenty of other advice and tips for you as well, including strategies to improve your senior wellness program, a case study on canine stem cell therapy, and one veterinarian's heartfelt plea to stop calling your front-desk staff "girls."

Click here to view all the May content.

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