Veterinary Economics board member on Rachael Ray Show

Veterinary Economics board member on Rachael Ray Show

Dr. Ernie Ward's daytime TV segment addresses canine behavior problems
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Jul 11, 2008
By dvm360.com staff

Veterinarians these days do it all: Provide medical care, educate clients—and appear on television. Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member Dr. Ernie Ward recently visited the home of a Rachael Ray Show viewer. In the taped segment, which aired on the show July 9, the viewer was having trouble with her dog eating food off the counter, tugging at its leash, and hogging the couch. Dr. Ward provided the viewer with step-by-step tips for correcting her dog's behavior. A few weeks later, the woman and her dog had made some progress and Dr. Ward encouraged her to stick with the training.

The TV spot illustrates the increasing mindset of pets as family members, as well as the importance of pet owner education. More and more households own pets, so more and more people need help learning how to care for their pets. Veterinarians play an integral role in teaching clients the right moves, especially when it comes to behavior training. Even if your starring role is on a local news station or just in your practice's exam room, focus on client education to help pets and people.

For tips on educating clients, check out these Veterinary Economics articles written by Dr. Ward:

Technology for client communication

Obesity: A big problem

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