From the Veterinary Economics archives: How successful are women veterinarians?

From the Veterinary Economics archives: How successful are women veterinarians?

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Jun 23, 2008
By dvm360.com staff

If you're interested in what the conversation about women in the profession was like circa 1969, check out this article. Just to whet your appetite, we present this quote from author Larry Weber, EdD, one-time assistant to the dean at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois. In it Dr. Weber was questioning the growing number of female students in the nation's veterinary schools (sound familiar?):

It would appear wise, during the screening interview, to have the female candidate review carefully her future role in veterinary medicine. In certain cases, sufficient data may be obtained, during the interview, to deny admission to an applicant. In other cases, the applicant herself may realize she is not suited for entry into the veterinary profession and will voluntarily withdraw her application.

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