Veterinarians' retirement money may run out before they do

Veterinarians' retirement money may run out before they do

A new look at investing and saving levels finds Americans' retirement funds won't carry them through.
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Nov 16, 2010
By dvm360.com staff

Modern science allows pets, pet owners, and veterinarians to live longer, healthier lives. That's only a problem for those who are underfunded in their retirements. Unfortunately, that could be a lot of veterinarians.

The Employee Benefit Research Institute estimates that 10 percent of Americans in the highest income bracket will run short of money 20 years after retirement. It's worse for those in the upper middle class, where 29 percent will come up short after 20 years.

The worst off, of course, are those in the lowest income bracket. More than 40 percent will lack money to cover basic expenses and uninsured healthcare costs just 10 years after retirement.

If you're concerned you're not saving enough—or you're not putting enough aside for retirement—dive into the related links below.

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