Veterinarians' book teaches kids about pet safety

Veterinarians' book teaches kids about pet safety

Educational book includes activities that promote animal welfare and wellness.
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Nov 23, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
You have all kinds of tools and equipment in your veterinary practice. But you might be missing one of the most important resources in educating your community about animal health: a children’s book.

Pets’ Playground: Playing Safe in a Dog-and-Cat World is an educational book written by Dr. Amanda Chin, BVSc. The book is intended to help children from ages 4 to 9 learn how to safely care for their pets while strengthening the human-animal bond.

Pets’ Playground is designed to be used in veterinary waiting rooms. Veterinarians can also photocopy activities in the book to give to children, or use information in the book to help with elementary school presentations. The book can also be sent home with clients.

The book teaches children:

> How to read dog and cat body language
> The right ways to pet, play with, and hold a pet
> How to practice good hygiene
> The difference between their own pets and stranger pets
> Situations to avoid and how to act when caught in a bad situation
> How to be responsible pet owners
> The role of the veterinarian

Pets’ Playground can be ordered by clicking here.

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