Spruce up your "front door" - Veterinary Economics
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Spruce up your "front door"
Attracting and keeping clients is a comprehensive effort. Make sure you're covering all your bases when it comes to your practice's image.

VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Your practice’s front door is more than just an entrance to your clinic. Your front door is your practice’s brand; your image. In other words, the front door is the first point of contact clients have with your practice. Here are some examples from Lacher McDonald and Co. of these points of contact and how you can improve yours.

Signage. A good sign is easily read and uncluttered. Use bold, simple lettering that people can see when driving by your practice. See also: Improving curb appeal

Web site. Your site should have a clean look and load quickly. Make sure your logo is visible and the site is easy to navigate. See also: 4 ways to make your site sticky

E-mails. When team members respond to a client’s e-mail, make sure they’re using proper English, typing carefully, and using spell check. Nothing hurts your practice’s image like an e-mail that reads, “Murphy’s appoitment is at 3. C u then.” See also: Technology for client communication

The telephone. Nobody likes talking to a machine. If your answering system involves a complicated series of menus, think about simplifying the process for clients. And encourage receptionists to avoid multitasking when they answer the phone—clients often notice when they don’t have the receptionist’s full attention. See also: Hang up on bad phone protocol

Business cards. You don’t have to spend a lot of money, just make sure your cards include your practice’s name and contact information, and don’t try to jam too much information into a small space. See also: Business cards are golden

The front door. Touch up the landscaping and ensure that outdoor lighting is sufficient. Also, chains and leashes nick up doors quickly, so give the door a fresh coat of paint or stain if necessary. See also: Practice design on a dime

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Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS,
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