Using the Internet at work at the veterinary practice

Using the Internet at work at the veterinary practice

It's great for looking at funny cat pictures, sure. But the Internet is also a powerful tool that can help your practice become more productive and profitable.
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Aug 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

Anyone with an Internet connection knows how easy it is to get lost on the Web. One minute you're checking your e-mail or paying a utility bill, and the next you're watching hours' worth of funny pet videos on YouTube. There's plenty of nonsense out there, and lost productivity is the last thing you want to introduce into your veterinary practice.

But failing to provide Internet access to your team members has its drawbacks, too, according to Donna Recupido-Bauman, CVPM, hospital administrator at Veterinary Specialty Care in Mt. Pleasant, S.C. First, you're missing out on important medical research opportunities, she says. Veterinary reference books are useful tools, but a quick Internet search is often more helpful, Recupido-Bauman says. Online CE is also available from a variety of sources, and many of the classes are free.


More in this package:
How much time do you spend accessing veterinary information online while you're at work?
What do you use the Internet for at work?
Are employees at your veterinary practice able to access the Web?


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