Use your animal knowledge to build bonds with clients

Use your animal knowledge to build bonds with clients

Share your favorite trivia about pets with clients.
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Sep 01, 2013

I love "filing away" little bits of interesting information about animals and pets, and sharing them comes naturally. Sharing is what I've always done in the exam room, and that the gift of "animal trivia" works so well with social media comes as no surprise to me.

You too can show the pet owner something on the outside or inside of their pet they've never noticed and explain why it's important. Here are some examples:

> Point out how dogs lick one side of their nose, then the other, always starting with the same side, or how cats do the same when grooming.

> Show clients the carpal pad of a cat and explain that it's for protection during rapid deceleration—think "skid pads."

> Tell them that the number of bones in a cat's body depends on gender and tail length, and why.

People love trivia, especially when you can link it to their own beloved pet.

Dr. Marty Becker is a popular speaker and author of more than 22 top-selling books. He is the resident veterinarian on Good Morning America, a regular guest on The Dr. Oz Show and the lead veterinary contributor to http://www.vetstreet.com/ . Dr. Becker practices at North Idaho Animal Hospital in Sandpoint, Ida., and Lakewood Animal Hospital in Coeur d'Alene, Ida.

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