Use this tool to help battle canine hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing's disease)

Use this tool to help battle canine hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing's disease)

This handout gives your clients the information they need about the cost and tests involved in managing their pet's chronic disease.
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Jun 09, 2016
By dvm360.com staff

Chronic diseases like hyperadrenocorticism can be hard for owners of afflicted dogs to swallow. And while you can't make the disease go away, you can ease pet owners' anxiety and confusion.

First, here's a quick breakdown on the differences among Cushing's syndrome, Cushing's disease and hyperadrenocorticism, courtesy of "Dr. Endocrine" himself, David Bruyette, DVM, DACVIM.

> Cushing's Syndrome encompasses any cause of elevated cortisol
concentration (pituitary dependent, adrenal dependent, meal induced, ectopic, etc.).
> Cushing's disease is pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism.
> Hyperadrenocorticism refers to any cause of elevated adrenal production of steroids (cortisol as well as sex steroids).

Clients need to know about the financial responsibility and time commitment involved in managing a chronic illness like Cushing's disease. You can help!

A client handout that details the tests needed to confirm the disease and monitor the pet's progress once treatment is underway, as well as the costs involved, will help your clients take an active role in their pet's long-term care—not to mention improve your practice's efficiency.

Ultimately, it's up to you and your team to communicate about Cushing's syndrome and other adrenal conditions in a way that eases clients' minds and helps them confront their fears about the pet's future. Download this tool now to get started.

And just for fun ... did you know Dr. Bruyette is a Cushing's superfan? In this video, he comes clean about his fascination with all things Cushing's. He even collects Harvey Cushing memorabilia—including his books and manuscripts, and even a signed copy of a manuscript written by James Parkinson called "Essay on the Shaking Palsy" that Harvey Cushing gave to one of his surgery residents as a Christmas gift.