Use these posts and tweets to get pets with separation anxiety the help they need

Use these posts and tweets to get pets with separation anxiety the help they need

And help your clients not be part of the problem when it comes to their pets’ separation anxiety.
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Jan 08, 2016
By dvm360.com staff

Separation anxiety can be frustrating for your clients. Here are some premade tweets and Facebook posts you can use to help them help their pets.

Tweets: Just press the Twitter buttons below and log in to tweet these messages.

Facebook posts: Copy the text, log into Facebook, and paste the text into the status field.

Got a separation anxiety situation in your house? We know it's tough, but ignore your dog until he's relaxed. 

Can you tell a few stories that start with: “Every time I leave my house, my dog… “ Check out this handout and see if you recognize any signs of anxiety in your pet. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw


It's so hard! But don't interact with or acknowledge the behavior of an anxious dog when you leave or arrive home.

Does your dog go a little nuts when you leave or come home? He may be exhibiting signs of separation anxiety. Check out this handout and give us a call. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw


Separation anxiety: Don't respond to a pet's attempts to get attention. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw

Destruction, barking, whining, inappropriate elimination, and excessive salivation, are all signs of separation anxiety in your dog. Our advice? Don't punish your dog's behavior because it will just increase the dog's anxiety level. Do your best to ignore the behavior—and the dog—until the dog returns to a relaxed state. We know it's difficult, but responding to your dog's attempt to get your attention in that manner may only encourage it. Give us a call. We can help.


Responding to barks, whines, jumps or paws because of separation anxiety only encourages the behavior.

Think your dog might have separation anxiety? It usually presents as destruction, barking, whining, inappropriate elimination and excessive salivation. Don't worry we can help. Learn more with this handout. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw


Indoor relaxation and graduated departure techniques can help dogs with separation anxiety.

Does your dog bark, whine, jump up or paw when you leave the house? These might be signs of separation anxiety. Check out this handout http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw and give us a call.


A dog with separation anxiety may need you to ignore him.

This may seem like a strange question, but… Can you go to the bathroom without your dog? If not, check out this handout. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw


Try a toy stuffed with treats to distract an anxious dog before leaving home.

Dogs with separation anxiety may bark, whine, jump or paw to get attention. Don't reinforce the behavior by acknowledging it or punishing it. Ignore your dog until he or she is more relaxed. Check out this handout if you want to learn more. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw


Signs of pet anxiety: Destruction, baking, whining, inappropriate elimination and excessive salivation. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw

Does your dog lose it when you leave the house? Try this: Ignore your dog for 30 minutes before leaving the house. Five to 10 minutes before you leave, give him a toy stuffed with treats to distract him from your departure.


 Punishing the results of a pet's anxiety only increases anxiety.

Dogs that chew, bark, whine, go to the bathroom on the floor or excessively salivate while you're away are not bad dogs. They may be suffering from separation anxiety. Don't punish the behavior. It will just increase your dog's anxiety. Instead, ignore your dog until he's in a more relaxed state so you don't reinforce attention-seeking behavior. Reduce anxiety by providing your dog with regular exercise and the next time you leave the house give him a toy stuffed with treats to distract him from your departure.


 Reduce your pet's anxiety with regular exercise.

Ever come home to your shoes chewed to smithereens, a nice yellow puddle and a dog that looks like he just ran a marathon? You may be furious and your dog may be jumping all over you, but before you react—don't. Your dog may have separation anxiety. Engaging in your dog's attention-seeking behavior may further encourage it. Punishing the behavior will only increase the anxiety. Instead, ignore your dog until he is in a more relaxed state. Try exercising your dog regularly to reduce anxiety. Ignore your dog 30 minutes before you leave the house and leave your dog a toy stuffed with treats five to 10 minutes before you leave to distract him from your departure. To learn more, check this out: http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw


 Get more information on separation anxiety in pets here: http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw

Is your pet doing anything that's frustrating to you or your family? For example, barking like crazy every time you try to leave the house? Check this out: http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw


 Can you leave the room without your dog losing it? If not, it might be a sign of anxiety. http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw

It's not wrong to admit your dog is driving you crazy. He will hardly let you leave the house, let alone go to the bathroom on your own. Sound familiar? We can help. Start here: http://bit.ly/1JY8VXw