Understanding flea and tick life cycles

Understanding flea and tick life cycles

Think veterinary clients understand how quickly these parasites can spiral out of control in their environment? Give them an informational handout to better understand the life cycles of these pests—and heed your recommendations for prevention and control.
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Jul 01, 2013
By dvm360.com staff

Let’s face it—parasites are gross. And a few of the most persistent parasites to plague your clients’ pets are fleas and ticks. No pet owner likes to consider the possibility that their dog or cat has them, but the reality is that without the proper protection, pets can easily pick up these pesky bugs and introduce them into the home or surrounding environment.

While it might be your typical M.O. to discuss the diseases and discomfort these parasites can cause pets, another way to get clients on board with your preventive recommendations is to discuss the life cycles of fleas and ticks—and stress how easily these parasites can run amok if given the chance.

To give your clients a better understanding of how flea and tick populations develop, head over to dvm360.com/lifecycles and download free pet owner handouts that explain the life cycles of these parasites.

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