Top 10 dog and cat medical conditions in 2011

Top 10 dog and cat medical conditions in 2011

Pet insurance company reveals most common causes of veterinary visits.
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Apr 04, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

While the majority of these conditions are curable, they can become chronic and expensive to treat. Veterinary Pet Insurance Co. (VPI) policyholders spent more than $46 million in 2011 treating the 10 most common medical conditions afflicting their pets. VPI recently sorted its database of more than 485,000 insured pets to determine the top 10 dog and cat medical conditions in 2011.

Dogs

  1. Ear infection
  2. Skin allergies
  3. Skin infection
  4. Non-cancerous skin growth
  5. Upset stomach
  6. Intestinal upset/diarrhea
  7. Arthritis
  8. Bladder infection
  9. Bruise or contusion
  10. Underactive thyroid

Cats

  1. Bladder infection
  2. Chronic kidney disease
  3. Overactive thyroid
  4. Upset stomach
  5. Periodontitis/dental disease
  6. Diabetes
  7. Intestinal upset/diarrhea
  8. Ear infection
  9. Skin Allergies
  10. Lymphosarcoma

In 2011, VPI received more than 62,000 canine claims for ear infections, the most common cause for taking a dog to see a veterinarian. The average claim fee was $98 per office visit. For cats, a bladder infection was the most common reason to take your kitty to the veterinarian. VPI received more than 3,800 medical claims for this ailment—with an average claim amount of $233 per office visit. The most expensive canine condition on the list (non-cancerous skin growth) cost an average of $220 per visit, while, for cats, the most expensive condition (lymphosarcoma) cost an average of $426 per visit.

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