Top 10 dog and cat medical conditions in 2011

Top 10 dog and cat medical conditions in 2011

Pet insurance company reveals most common causes of veterinary visits.
source-image
Apr 04, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

While the majority of these conditions are curable, they can become chronic and expensive to treat. Veterinary Pet Insurance Co. (VPI) policyholders spent more than $46 million in 2011 treating the 10 most common medical conditions afflicting their pets. VPI recently sorted its database of more than 485,000 insured pets to determine the top 10 dog and cat medical conditions in 2011.

Dogs

  1. Ear infection
  2. Skin allergies
  3. Skin infection
  4. Non-cancerous skin growth
  5. Upset stomach
  6. Intestinal upset/diarrhea
  7. Arthritis
  8. Bladder infection
  9. Bruise or contusion
  10. Underactive thyroid

Cats

  1. Bladder infection
  2. Chronic kidney disease
  3. Overactive thyroid
  4. Upset stomach
  5. Periodontitis/dental disease
  6. Diabetes
  7. Intestinal upset/diarrhea
  8. Ear infection
  9. Skin Allergies
  10. Lymphosarcoma

In 2011, VPI received more than 62,000 canine claims for ear infections, the most common cause for taking a dog to see a veterinarian. The average claim fee was $98 per office visit. For cats, a bladder infection was the most common reason to take your kitty to the veterinarian. VPI received more than 3,800 medical claims for this ailment—with an average claim amount of $233 per office visit. The most expensive canine condition on the list (non-cancerous skin growth) cost an average of $220 per visit, while, for cats, the most expensive condition (lymphosarcoma) cost an average of $426 per visit.

Hot topics on dvm360

Follow dvm360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest

For quick updates and to touch base with the editors of dvm360, Veterinary Economics, Veterinary Medicine, and Firstline, and check us out on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

Sell veterinary clients on your service

But you don't have to have butler-style service to win new clients and keep existing clients happy.

Why veterinarians should be more like a Louisiana shoeshiner

If my veterinary clients feel half as good as I did after visiting the 'Michael Jordan of shoeshines,' I'll be thrilled.

Texts from your veterinary clinic cat

If your clinic cat had a cell phone and opposable thumbs, what would he or she text you?

Learning goodbye: Veterinarians fill a void by focusing on end of life care

Veterinarians dedicating their careers to hospice and euthansia medicine may be pioneering the profession's next specialty—at clients' request.