Tips to help veterinary clients prevent barn fires

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Tips to help veterinary clients prevent barn fires

Barn fires can be devastating to your clients. Help them prevent disaster with these tips.
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May 22, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

According to the Humane Society, barn fires are the leading disaster for horses. Preventing barn fires and being prepared in the event of a fire can mean the difference between life and death for your clients' animals. Knowledge of the danger of fires and how to deal with them are essential, and vigilance is key to prevention. Here are some tips you can use to educate your clients.

  • Prohibit smoking in or around the barn. A discarded cigarette can ignite dry bedding or hay in seconds.
  • Avoid parking tractors and vehicles in or near the barn. Engine heat and backfires can spark a flame.
  • Store other machinery and flammable materials outside the barn.
  • Inspect electrical systems regularly and immediately correct any problems. Rodents can chew on electrical wiring and cause damage that quickly becomes a fire hazard.
  • Keep appliances to a minimum in the barn. Use stall fans, space heaters, and radios only when someone is in the barn.
  • Be sure hay is dry before storing it. Hay that is too moist may spontaneously combust. Store hay outside the barn in a dry, covered area when possible.

For a PDF from the Humane Society you can share with your clients about barn safety, click here.

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