Team members say female veterinarians are as good as men ... or better.

Team members say female veterinarians are as good as men ... or better.

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Jun 10, 2008
By dvm360.com staff

Veterinary team members don't discriminate. They think highly of both male and female veterinarians, according to survey results from VetMedTeam.com. Team members surveyed did think female veterinarians showed positive traits a little more often than men. Female veterinarians were considered a little more understanding, strong-willed, cooperative, respected, and team-oriented. They also thought female doctors were slightly more up to the task of disciplining and firing: 59 percent say female doctors are ready, 56 percent say male doctors are ready.

When it comes to pet care recommendations, team members say gender doesn't play a role. Roughly 85 percent say both male and female doctors' recommendations are based on the best medicine and clients take them seriously. A smaller number—about 50 percent—say doctors' recommendations are negotiable and based on what the client can afford. Team members say female doctors aren't giving weaker recommendations than men, according to the survey.

Almost 75 percent of those polled said they don't care whether a doctor is male or female—as long as he or she practices good management and medicine.

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