Tackling tick talks across the map

Tackling tick talks across the map

Veterinary clients are often in the dark about the risk ticks present for their pets. Use these tips to tackle tough tick talks, region by region.
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Mar 01, 2013
By dvm360.com staff

Sometimes clients fail to take ticks seriously—and suffer the consequences.

“Your veterinary team probably knows the danger that ticks present to pets,” says Ciera Sallese, CVT, a technician at Metzger Animal Hospital in State College, Pa. “But it’s important for each of us to remember that the diseases that we’re so familiar with may be completely foreign to the owners of affected pets. Often, the only chance we get to talk about prevention is when pet owners visit for an annual exam. So it’s important to use this time wisely and highlight key facts about tick-borne diseases.”

For example, Sallese says team members should highlight the vector-borne diseases that are most common in their area, stressing preventives and regular inspections to protect pets against disease. And she says it’s also important to explain to clients that even with a perfect prevention protocol, just one tick on a pet can spread a disease. So, routine testing can either assure pet owners that their pet has been successfully protected or it can help diagnose a disease so that the veterinarian can offer treatment. Use this handout to review tick tips with your team, region by region.

Head over to dvm360.com/ticktalk to download a handout on common ticks across the map and tips for client awareness.

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