Survey your veterinary clients to measure success

Survey your veterinary clients to measure success

Wonder what your clients really think of the care and service you provide? A survey gives you the answers you need to do well—and improve.
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Dec 02, 2013
By dvm360.com staff

How long has it been since you took a good look at your practice through the eyes of a client? Is your practice inviting and comfortable? Do pets and their owners get a warm welcome from the receptionists when they walk through your doors? Are your technicians and assistants making the appropriate recommendations for preventive care and wellness in the exam rooms? Does everyone on your team have a positive attitude and contribute to a healthy work environment? If not, pet owners will notice—and it may be costing you clients and revenue.

According to Benchmarks 2013: A Study of Well-Managed Practices from Veterinary Economics and Wutchiett Tumblin and Associates, one of the most effective strategies to find out how your practice is doing is to conduct a client satisfaction survey.

In order to get the best response from clients, keep your survey brief and to the point. Ask thoughtful questions about the appearance of your practice, client and patient care, and the overall experience. Try your first with an online survey site, such as SurveyMonkey, that lets you customize your questions and analyze the results. E-mail clients the survey link and post it via social media sites, such as Facebook. If you prefer to conduct the survey in person, print copies and ask clients to take just a few moments to fill one out as their pet is being discharged.

To download a sample practice client survey from Dr. Ross Clark's Open Book Management, head over to dvm360.com/practicesurvey. The book also is available for purchase at dvm360.com/buyopenbook. Want your practice to rival other well-managed ones? Get Benchmarks 2013 and Benchmarks 2012 for a discounted price at dvm360.com/buybenchmarks.

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