Q&A: YouTube? You bet!

Q&A: YouTube? You bet!

Our practice has Facebook and Twitter profiles, but we're looking for additional marketing opportunities. What should we try next?
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Jan 01, 2011

Facebook and Twitter are great for connecting with your clients, but YouTube is where the real magic happens, says Karyn Gavzer, MBA, CVPM, owner of KG Marketing and Training in Springboro, Ohio. All it takes is a camera, a little personality, and perhaps some editing know-how, and you've got an easy, personalized way to show clients what you do every day—and how well you take care of pets at your hospital.

The best way to use YouTube is to give easy tutorials that your clients can use at home, Gavzer says. Teach them how to crate train a puppy, how to potty train a pet, brush a pet's teeth, or clip a pet's nails. "These things are so routine and ordinary, but clients have no clue how to do them," Gavzer says. (Visit http://dvm360.com/3freevideos/ for some examples.)

Once you've shot and edited the videos, upload them to YouTube, then spread the word. Link to the video on your practice website, or embed it straight into your site. Post links on Facebook and Twitter, driving users to your website. Pretty soon, you'll not only see more traffic online, you'll see more at your clinic as well.

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