Put some life into your yellow pages listing

Put some life into your yellow pages listing

Including just a name and phone number won’t cut it these days.
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Aug 04, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

As more potential clients shift to gathering information about your practice from the Internet, the future of yellow pages listings is uncertain. But the majority of veterinary practices still purchase listings, and plenty of clients choose a practice by flipping through the book. Here’s a guide to putting a little color into your yellow pages listing.

Go local. Instead of placing listings in multiple yellow pages books, focus on your immediate area, says Dr. Christine Merle, MBA, CVPM, a consultant with Brakke Veterinary Practice Management Group. Most clients probably live within 15 to 20 miles of your clinic, particularly in large areas. The more localized the listing, the more results you’ll see.

Show off your talents. It’s easy for your practice to get lost in the shuffle of names. So show clients what you have to offer. Most practices offer wellness care, but perhaps yours offers laser surgery or laparoscopic spays. Don’t be modest—shout your services to the world.

Hope for a good spot. Unfortunately, part of a yellow pages ad’s effectiveness is tied to its position on the page. There’s little you can do about this, but making your ad legible, informative, and mistake-free is a good start.

Finally, it may sound obvious, but make sure all of your contact information is included—and accurate. Yellow pages marketing isn’t going away anytime soon, Dr. Merle says, so make sure you have a clear plan in mind. “Ask yourself ‘Who are we targeting and what’s the purpose of this marketing method?’” she says. “That’s how you invest your money.”

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