Puppy ownership 101

Puppy ownership 101

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Feb 01, 2007



We want to help clients make informed decisions, so we offer appointments for those considering adding a new puppy to the family. We charge about $40 for the appointment and it lasts about an hour, depending on how many questions the family has. Clients are thankful, and they're often overwhelmed at all that's involved in pet ownership.

We give each client a folder containing brochures about pet insurance, microchipping, heartworm preventives, and flea and tick preventives, as well as an educational page dedicated to each of those topics. I also bring several items to the visit, such as toys, brushes, a toothbrush and toothpaste, oral care treats, a leash, different types of collars, and a microchip and scanner.

During the appointment, I educate clients about:

  • how much work a puppy can be
  • the veterinary wellness needs of a puppy
  • breed characteristics so the client chooses a puppy that's suited to his or her family and lifestyle
  • pet insurance and the benefits of getting it early
  • behavioral training for commands such as sit, down, and stay, and tips to practice and implement the commands into the puppy's daily activities
  • ways to prevent problems related to digging and chewing
  • appropriate toys for puppy development
  • feeding schedules and potty training
  • family involvement in the puppy's training
  • playing with the puppy's feet and teeth so that veterinary visits aren't as stressful for the dog
  • different collars and their uses.

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