Financial Management | Veterinary Economics

Financial Management

Nov 01, 2005
More than 88 percent of this year's new veterinarians graduated with educational debt averaging $88,077. Now working, they're taking home less than $44,000 a year.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Nov 01, 2005
A retainer agreement should include a statement of hourly billing rates.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
How do you determine expected yearly production for veterinarians? How should it change based on years of experience?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
What's the expected average increase in gross income in the year after opening a practice?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
What percent of practice revenue should go to food and products?
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
If missed charges are slipping out the door, you may be seeing a smaller paycheck and fewer benefits—and you may find it harder to offer high-quality care.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Lynette Ott, the practice manager at Barton Heights Veterinary Hospital in Stroudsburg, Pa., always heard that 20 percent of clients bring in 80 percent of income. Not content to blindly adopt the mantra, Ott went looking for data.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
I perform services at a discount for a local nonprofit group. Can I write off the discounts?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Oct 01, 2005
Do you feel like you're always batting at your fees without ever pinning down the perfect fee schedule? Use this advice to align your fees with the level of client service and animal care you provide.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2005
Practitioners charge too little because they cannot keep up with the literature.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2005
Being in your own business is working 80 hours a week so that you can avoid working 40 hours a week for someone else.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Sep 01, 2005
The 2005 Well-Managed Practice Study shows how important strategic planning is to achieving your practice vision—and respondents say their only regrets are not planning sooner.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Sep 01, 2005
Q. I'm an associate veterinarian paid on a straight salary. My employer doesn't offer group health insurance as part of my contract, but I'd like him to pay my medical insurance premiums and those of my husband and son. I checked with the IRS, and it appears that he can pay the premiums for my family tax-free. If he offers me this benefit, does he have to offer it to everyone on salary?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 19, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
For 12 years, Dr. Steve Bishop and his crew at Animal Care Hospital in Phoenix have been tapping the retired population to make callbacks in the early evening. Doing so frees time for receptionists to work on other jobs, he says. "Plus, the hourly pay is less than for a receptionist, and the workers are more flexible with their time."
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Choosing to ignore monthly financial reports could cost you as much as $42,000 per year. Are you willing to give that money away?