Potty training made easy

Potty training made easy

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Jun 01, 2007

Housetraining can be frustrating for clients when they don't understand their pet's schedule. Dogs are creatures of habit and for the most part will do the same thing at the same time every day. But puppies aren't on a schedule because they aren't able to hold their urine and poop. What we do know is that most puppies will go potty 15 to 30 minutes after they eat or drink. So to help our clients nail down potty training, we give them a "wee-wee poo-poo chart." Here's how it works:

1. Clients fill in the time and then put an "X" in the food and water boxes. Then they wait 15 to 30 minutes—clients can fine-tune this as they go—and note the time on the chart when they take the dog out. Then they mark if the puppy went number one or number two. This routine continues all day. Clients begin to see a pattern that lets them them know when their dog needs to go out.

2. The chart encourages everyone in the family to get involved in housetraining. Family members can see who fed the puppy and when, and who took the puppy outside and what she did. This prevents overfeeding and a puppy who's crossing his little doggie legs—or, worse yet, having an accident.

Look online. To download a copy of the wee-wee, poo-poo chart, click here|~www.vetecon.com/vetec/data/articlestandard/vetec/232007/432037/article.pdf

Donna Bauman is the practice manager at Ottawa Animal Hospital in Holland, Mich.

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