Posts and tweets about older pets' failing senses

Posts and tweets about older pets' failing senses

Use social media platforms to alert clients to health concerns and clinical signs to look for as pets age.
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Jan 09, 2014
By dvm360.com staff

Tweets: Just press the buttons below and log in to tweet these messages.

Facebook posts: Copy this type, log into Facebook, and paste the type into the status field:

DYK? Undetected glaucoma can lead to irreversible blindness in your senior #pet. Bring your furry friend in for a test today!

When your older pet comes in for a regular retinal exam, your veterinarian can look for signs of bleeding, degeneration, inflammation or detachment and recommend treatment before it turns into a larger health issue.


Want to soothe your aging #pet? Regular massage, joint manipulation or gentle grooming can help decrease anxiety.

According to Dr. Karen Overall, disorientation is one of the most common behavioral changes clients notice in their aging pets. If your dog or cat starts getting lost and confused in your house or outside, it could be a sign of age-related cognitive dysfunction.


Playing regularly with senior #pets, even if they’re slowing down with age, stimulates animals’ brains and keeps them acting younger.

Is your senior dog or cat pacing and vocalizing in the middle of the night, leaving you sleepless and helpless? Make an appointment with us so we can discuss this common issue for older pets, find a solution and put and end to the late-night ruckus.


If your geriatric #pet has lost interest in food and is losing weight, come see us for a diagnostic test to rule out underlying health problems.

As with humans, many senior pets start to lose hearing as they age. If your pet is hearing impaired, try tapping on the floor loudly upon entering a room to prevent startling the animal, since this can lead to fear biting.


Don’t let your #pet suffer with arthritis pain. Noticing changes in walking or jumping? It might be time for a #veterinary clinic visit.

Did you know that undetected glaucoma can lead to irreversible blindness in your senior pet? Prevent this by bringing your furry friend in today to get tested.


Get your #pet in for a regular retinal exam to treat any problems before they become larger health issues.

Wondering what you can do to ease your aging cat or dog’s anxiety? Try regular massage, joint manipulation or gentle grooming to help them relax.


Does your senior #pet get lost and confused in your house or outside? It could be a sign of age-related cognitive dysfunction.

Just because your senior cat or dog is slowing down doesn’t mean you should stop playing with them. In fact, regular playtime stimulates aging animals’ brains and keeps them acting younger. So, break out the pet toys and let the fun—and brain benefits—begin!


If your senior #pet is pacing and vocalizing at night, make an appointment with us so we can help you end the late-night ruckus.

Has your geriatric pet lost interest in food and lost weight? A diagnostic test will help to rule out any underlying health problems and nip them in the bud before more major issues develop.


If your senior #pet is hearing impaired, tap loudly on the floor upon entering a room to prevent startling and fear biting.

If you notice changes in your pet’s walking or jumping, they could be suffering with arthritis pain. Don’t let the hurt continue—visit our clinic today so we can talk about treatment options.


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