Posts and tweets about canine aggression

Posts and tweets about canine aggression

Teach clients the dos and don'ts of interacting with and managing an aggressive dog using these posts and tweets.
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Sep 01, 2014
By dvm360.com staff

Tweets: Just press the buttons below and log in to tweet these messages.

Facebook posts: Copy this type, log into Facebook, and paste the type into the status field:

If your #dog is aggressive when fed, feed it in a separate room with the door closed.

Feed an aggressive dog in a separate room with the door closed and lock it when kids are in the house.

 


Does your #dog scratch you or jump on you or others? Don’t push it down. Fold your arms and turn away.

If your dog scratches you or jumps on you or others, don’t push it down. Instead, fold your arms and turn away. Attention withdrawal is one of the best ways to correct aggressive dogs’ behaviors because often they’re trying to manipulate you into interaction.

 


Never forcefully jerk your #dog’s collar or leash—this can escalate aggression.

Never jerk your dog’s collar or leash or use it forcefully. This will only cause more aggression.


When playing with an aggressive #dog, don’t slap or wrestle. Toys are best.

Don’t play tug-of-war with your aggressive dog unless you can teach it to sit, take the toy only on command and give it back when you ask for it. Also, never fling your dog around while holding onto the toy.


If your #dog tends to be aggressive, consider using a head collar for walks.

If your dog tends to be aggressive, consider using a head collar for walks. This muzzle alternative allows you to close your dog’s mouth in a stressful situation and safely control it until it calms down.

 


Myth: An aggressive #dog should always be fed in its crate. Reality: Doing this can make it more territorial.

Don’t feed an aggressive dog in its crate—this can cause it to become more territorial. Likely, the dog cares either about its food or feeding location—so the best thing to do is to feed it in a separate room away from people.

 


Dominance Aggression Syndrome in #dogs: Persistent biting, snapping and growling with dominance signals such as eye contact and erect ears.

Dominance Aggression Syndrome in canines often includes biting, snapping and growling accompanied by multiple ritual dominance signals such as eye contact, erect ears and elevated tail.

 


A #dog’s aggression is often made worse by physical punishment.

A dog’s aggression is often exacerbated by physical punishment. Disrupt a bad situation by softly and firmly saying “no,” encouraging the dog to join you in a different room or leaving the dog alone.

 

Signals of dominance in #dogs: erect and forward ears, elevated tail, eye contact and leaning forward.

Signals of dominance in dogs include erect and forward ears, elevated tail, eye contact and leaning forward.

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