Pinpoint your laser fees

Pinpoint your laser fees

A Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member shares his fees for laser use.
source-image
Jan 01, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

We asked Dr. Jim Kramer, co-owner of Columbus Animal Hospital in Columbus, Neb., what conditions and procedures he uses a laser for and the total amount he charges. Dr. Kramer offered this list:

Stenotic nares: $270
Elongated soft palate: $325
Nasal polyps: $225
Geriatric wards: $110 to $150
Hot spots: $165
Benign polyp debulking: $350 to $600
Resection of hyper-reflective gingiva: $75 to $175 in addition to dental cleaning charges    
Removal of dystichias: $350

Of course, the fee Dr. Kramer charges also depends on the size of the animal, the scope of the project, and whether he and his team will perform additional procedures at the same time. "Once an animal is anesthetized we can often do more than one procedure without duplicating the cost of anesthesia, hospitalization, preanesthetic exam, and medications," he says.

Dr. Kramer generally adds $68.50 when he uses a laser for procedures that could be done with or without a laser such as spays and neuters. For procedures that he performs exclusively with the laser, he adds $150 for laser use, plus any other related charges.

 

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