Overcome team conflict in veterinary practice

Overcome team conflict in veterinary practice

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Jul 27, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
Bickering, gossip, game-playing: Besides being downright annoying, this type of coworker conflict can reduce a great veterinary practice to a disorganized heap of shoddy client and patient care. It’s time to stop the madness -- literally. This package gives you the data about conflict: how many veterinary practices suffer conflict, who's the cause, and what kinds of conflict you're likely up against. Check out the numbers, then get your complete guide to managing conflict here. (We'll give you that link again at the end,too.)

Data source: 2010 Veterinary Economics State of the Industry Study

The complete package:
Is conflict among employees a problem in veterinary practices?
Is conflict between clients and employees a problem in veterinary practices?
What qualifies as conflict?
What else would you define as "conflict"?
Who causes conflict?
Have you ever done this?
Has an employee ever ...
One strategy you can try is to develop a code of ethics for handling conflict in the workplace. This should include a definition of what conflict actually entails. While some actions are clearly on the list -- yelling, pushing, and so on -- others you may need to think about. Is any disagreement a form of conflict? What about gossip? Get the general consensus from veterinarians on the next two pages.

Data source: 2010 Veterinary Economics State of the Industry Study

The complete package:
Is conflict among employees a problem in veterinary practices?
Is conflict between clients and employees a problem in veterinary practices?
What qualifies as conflict?
What else would you define as "conflict"?
Who causes conflict?
Have you ever done this?
Has an employee ever ...
OK, so veterinarians and practice managers aren’t the top two contenders for making trouble. As you can see here, that title goes to veterinary technicians and receptionists. But owners and managers are still responsible for maintaining team harmony. In fact, it’s the management team’s job to prevent conflict from happening in the first place. How do you that? Put some policies in place—and enforce them.

Data source: 2010 Veterinary Economics State of the Industry Study

The complete package:
Is conflict among employees a problem in veterinary practices?
Is conflict between clients and employees a problem in veterinary practices?
What qualifies as conflict?
What else would you define as "conflict"?
Who causes conflict?
Have you ever done this?
Has an employee ever ...

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