Nonprofit group seeks to feed pets of the homeless

Nonprofit group seeks to feed pets of the homeless

Feeding Pets of the Homeless hopes to collect 75,000 pounds of pet food.
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Jun 19, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
Pets need to eat, even if their owners have little money to feed them. Feeding Pets of the Homeless wants to ensure pets across America are well-fed, regardless of their owner’s financial situation.

The nonprofit organization has challenged its member collection sites to collect 75,000 pounds of pet food by the end of the year. This goal is double the 37,500 pounds of pet food collected last year.

The food is distributed through local food banks, food pantries, homeless shelters, and Meals on Wheels in communities across the nation. Feeding Pets of the Homeless also awards grants to licensed veterinarians for setting up free clinics to provide wellness exams, vaccines, medications, parasite products, spaying or neutering, and pet food to needy pets. The grants are made possible by donations from the public.

Genevieve Frederick, executive director of Feeding Pets of the Homeless, says the economy has created a dire need for this food drive. “The numbers of homeless on the streets are increasing,” she says. “Many of these folks will not give up the only companion they have and love. Their bond is unbreakable.”

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