NCVEI: 55 percent of practices experience first-quarter growth

NCVEI: 55 percent of practices experience first-quarter growth

This year looks better, but growth isn't guaranteed, says CEO of National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues.
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Jun 25, 2010
By dvm360.com staff

More than half of veterinary practices surveyed report growth in the first quarter of 2010 compared to last year, according to data collected by the National Commission of Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI).

The NCVEI asked visitors to its website to compare their first-quarter 2010 revenue to first-quarter 2009, and about 200 of them participated. Here are the results:

> 26.6 percent of veterinary hospitals saw growth of more than 5 percent
> 28.2 percent saw growth of 1 percent to 5 percent
> 12.2 percent saw no growth
> 20.8 saw a decline of 1 percent to 5 percent
> 12.2 saw a decline of more than 5 percent
"The general mood when talking to veterinarians is that 2010 looks a little better, but only 55 percent are seeing growth," says NCVEI's CEO, Dr. Karen Felsted, CPA, CVPM.

The nonprofit NCVEI is seeking May financial numbers to enter in its anonymous database at ncvei.org and encouraging veterinarians to complete a short survey on discounts.

Click here for the NCVEI website.

Click here for the survey on discounts.

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