The most unusual resume mistakes job candidates make

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The most unusual resume mistakes job candidates make

You've probably had some, ahem, unique resumes come across your desk. Here's a look at what hiring managers across the country deal with on a daily basis.
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Nov 04, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

As a veterinary practice owner, you’ve probably seen some interesting resumes. According to a recent CareerBuilder study, about 45 percent of human resource managers say they spend, on average, less than one minute reviewing an application. When asked to recall the most memorable or unusual resumes, managers shared the following:

> Candidate listed her dog as reference
> Candidate said the more you paid him, the harder he worked
> Candidate was fired from different jobs, but included each one as a reference
> Candidate said he just wanted an opportunity to show off his new tie
> Candidate listed the ability to do the moonwalk as a special skill
> Candidates—a husband and wife looking to job share—submitted a co-written poem
> Candidate included “versatile toes” as a selling point
> Candidate said that he would be a “good asset to the company,” but failed to include the “et” in the word “asset”
> Candidate’s email address on the resume contained the phrase “shakinmybootie”
> Candidate included that she survived a bite from a deadly aquatic animal
> Candidate used first name only
> Candidate asked, “Would you pass up an opportunity to hire someone like this? I think not.”
> Candidate insisted that the company pay him to interview with them because his time was valuable
> Candidate shipped a lemon with a resume that read, “I am not a lemon.”
> Candidate included that he was arrested for assaulting his previous boss

Hopefully that last candidate in particular doesn’t work for your veterinary practice.

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