Marketing tip: Give clients the shirt off your back

Marketing tip: Give clients the shirt off your back

source-image
Oct 01, 2010
By dvm360.com staff


Photo courtesy of Laura Fowler
Our practice sells T-shirts printed with pictures of dogs and cats along with our hospital's information. Not only do clients love the shirts, we also get free advertising wherever they wear them. They've become quite popular and we have sold many!

—Laura Fowler, practice manager
Chenoweth Animal Hospital; Louisville, Ky.

Editor's note: Congratulations to this month's Pet Picassos winner! For details on entering this contest,* visit http://dvm360.com/practicetips.

* DISCLOSURES: No purchase necessary—a purchase will not increase your chances of winning. Promotion is limited to veterinarians, credentialed technicians, practice managers, receptionists, and assistants working in veterinary practices in the United States who are legal residents of the 50 United States or the District of Columbia and at least 21 years of age. Void where prohibited. Eligible entries will be judged on the tip's usefulness, creativity, and timeliness. One prize of a Pet Picassos canvas portrait, approximate retail value $250. End date of sweeps: Oct. 31, 2010. See full and complete official rules at http://dvm360.com/practicetips.

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