Mark Opperman: How to develop "10" employees

Mark Opperman: How to develop "10" employees

Practice managers, listen up—Veterinary Economics Managers’ Retreat shows you how to change your practice for the better right now.
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Jun 21, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

The Veterinary Economics Managers’ Retreat Aug. 27, held in conjunction with CVC Kansas City, features Mark Opperman, CVPM, and Sheila Grosdidier, RVT, of VMC Inc., sharing practical advice for practice and personnel management you can put to work now. You’ll learn to:

> Create a plan for the future of your practice
> Develop tip-top “10” employees
> Increase efficiency and productivity
> Monitor the important financial information you can control
> Manage your practice owner by “managing up”
> Envision the ideal veterinary hospital—soon to be yours!

You’ll also interact with other managers and talented professionals to solve your problems, improve your business skills, and a develop a plan of action to take your practice to the next level.

Get the early bird rate of $219 for the seminar if you register by July 22. Receive a special combo rate when you combine your registration with a Firstline Live or CVC Kansas City practice manager registration.

Visit TheCVC.com for more details, and see Related Links below for more content right now from Opperman and Grosdidier.

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