A look back: Hurricane Katrina destroys veterinary practice

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina landed in New Orleans, causing $81 billion in property damage. One of those properties was Dr. Scott Griffith's clinic.
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Oct 06, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

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Dr. Scott Griffith was in the process of selling his New Orleans veterinary practices in August 2005. Then Hurricane Katrina hit severely damaging one of his practices (picture above).

Click the Next button to view more photos of Dr. Griffith's former practice. Photos contributed by Dr. Scott Griffith.

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The storm surge was 20-feet high—Dr. Griffith's veterinary practice sign was tossed like a frisbee.


Click the Next button to view more photos of Dr. Griffith's former practice. Photos contributed by Dr. Scott Griffith.

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Katrina ripped one of the practice walls in half—she's the sixth strongest hurricane ever recorded and the third strongest hurricane to hit the U.S.



Click the Next button to view more photos of Dr. Griffith's former practice. Photos contributed by Dr. Scott Griffith.

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The hurricane caused levees to break and flooded nearly 80 percent of the city. Dr. Griffith's practice wasn't underwater but it was destroyed all the same.



Click the Next button to view more photos of Dr. Griffith's former practice. Photos contributed by Dr. Scott Griffith.

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Strong winds from the storm blew cement cinderblocks onto the veterinary hospital's roof.



Click the Next button to view more photos of Dr. Griffith's former practice. Photos contributed by Dr. Scott Griffith.

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After the hurricane hit, Dr. Griffith stayed in the city for a few days to take care of the pets at his clinic. He eventually evacuated (once the pets were flown to Texas). In the following two years he tried a number of business models.

He finally found the pulse of his new practice in the heart of his hometown—the French Quarter of New Orleans. Click here to read the whole story.


Photo contributed by Dr. Scott Griffith.