Leadership Strategies | Veterinary Economics

Leadership Strategies

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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2005
Studies show morale and turnover improve when team members feel appreciated.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2005
Commit to these 10 culture changes to build a terrific practice.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2005
Use these strategies to make sure tension never becomes toxic for you or your team.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Different people find different situations stressful, but some stressors transcend personal differences and affect a majority. Many such key job stresses are associated with these six categories:
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2005
Work better with goal planning.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2005
In prior articles, I gave advice on creating and writing a strong, compelling vision for your life and work. But crafting the vision is just the first step. Next you must figure out how to make your vision a reality.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Mar 01, 2005
I've played hockey for many years, often once or twice a week. One day it dawned on me I wasn't improving. Instead I was doing the same wrong things over and over--I was playing but not practicing. Finally, I took a skills class and was amazed at how much I didn't know.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Feb 01, 2005
You're enjoying practice, and your clients and team members are happy. But don't let complacency take hold. These common pitfalls can bump you off track.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Feb 01, 2005
Last month, we discussed the power of crafting a compelling practice vision. The next step: putting your vision in writing. As you're writing, see your vision as an already-accomplished reality, not merely as something you hope will happen. Write in the first person and present tense, creating a vivid mental image with as much detail as possible to bring your vision to life. Use all your senses—sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste—to develop your description.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Dec 01, 2004
Growing up in the South, I quickly learned that there were certain subjects one simply should not talk about in mixed company--religion, politics, and money. There are similar touchy topics in business, such as pay raises and compensation plans, staff disagreements, a desire to make important changes in the practice, and disagreement about management styles. Although we'd like to avoid these topics, they need to be discussed.
Dec 01, 2004
The leader's role changes at each stage of team development. Are you doing the right things to help your team grow and go?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Dec 01, 2004
By dvm360.com staff
Every year, practice owners review their employees, telling them what they did well and how they could improve. But have you ever taken time to give yourself a year-end review? Whether you're the boss, an associate, or a support staff member, you can benefit from evaluating your year, says Jinny Ditzler, author of Your Best Year Yet! A Proven Method for Making the Next Twelve Months the Most Successful Ever (Warner Books, 2000).
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2004
By dvm360.com staff
Set a date for your associate's buy-in, then use this timetable for a smooth transition.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2004
When you know what goals you really want to accomplish, the path to your dreams becomes clear. Here's how to harness the power of goal setting for your practice.