Keeping veterinary care affordable

Keeping veterinary care affordable

Helping clients pay is about more than just the bottom line. It's about building bonds and providing pets with the care they need.
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Aug 01, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
Striking the right balance between charging appropriately for your veterinary services and managing easy-on-the-pocket prices is like walking a tightrope, even in a good economy. Throw in cash-strapped clients and it's like tying cinderblocks to your feet. And while you'd love to provide proper care for every pet in need, your practice can't afford to foot that bill.

Fortunately, there are ways your veterinary practice can help clients pay for necessary veterinary care, and many of you are already doing them. See the chart below for a breakdown of how your colleagues are helping out.

Data source: 2010 Veterinary Economics State of the Industry Study

The complete package:
In your community, what events do you or your practice participate in?
More great ways to give back
Are you interested in giving back to your community, but don't know how to go about it? Whether you're looking to start a pet food bank, an Angel Fund, or a low-cost spay and neuter clinic, Veterinary Economics has you covered. Read success stories and get step-by-step directions on how your practice can get involved at dvm360.com/outreach.

The complete package:
In your community, what events do you or your practice participate in?
More great ways to give back

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