Keeping tabs on technology: How equipment can pay off

Keeping tabs on technology: How equipment can pay off

You may be set in your ways, but here's the bottom line: It's time to join your computer-savvy colleagues.
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Aug 01, 2009
By dvm360.com staff


A closer look
Anyone who drives an old, unreliable car understands the importance of regular maintenance. Without constant monitoring, small problems can go unnoticed—and then turn into big, expensive headaches. And getting those problems fixed has a major impact on your daily routine. How will you get where you need to go? Can you afford the repairs? When should you buy a newer car?


What do you use your computer system for?
Your practice equipment isn't much different from a car. Equipment malfunctions can cost your practice money for repairs, but they can also prevent you from offering the highest-quality care to your patients. Slow computers can cause a slowdown in your front desk employees' workflow—and drive them crazy with frustration.


What is the top benefit of technology in your practice?
Perhaps it's time to reevaluate the effectiveness of your equipment. Look for areas in your practice where archaic machines could improve productivity and bring in more revenue. If buying new equipment isn't an option, look for ways to get the most out of what you have. For example, just half of the practices we surveyed use their practice software for storing electronic medical records, and only 44 percent track client compliance. If your practice doesn't do these things, it might be time to start. Read on to see how your equipment and services offered compares to your colleagues'.


How willing are your practice owners to buy new equipment?

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