It's a comic life for Amanda Brown, DVM

It's a comic life for Amanda Brown, DVM

Introducing an online graphic novel, Generation Vet.
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Nov 24, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
Untitled Document

 What do you get when you cross an animal health professional who has a dream to become a comic book artist with a veterinarian with a penchant for writing? A brand new online graphic novel featuring the highs and lows of a single female veterinarian, Amanda Brown, DVM. The graphic novel, Generation Vet, made its debut in September.

Fulfilling their dreams of comic book stardom and writing fame, respectively, are the illustrator Phillip Barnes, a former graphic artist who now works for Wedgewood Pharmacy, and the writer Dr. Hillary Israeli, a practitioner at Ivens-Bronstein Veterinary Hospital in Ardmore, Pa. Three brief episodes, or minisodes, have been created so far. Barnes says that because of an increasing fan base and request for more content, new minisodes will be posted on the 15th of every month.

Barnes and Dr. Israeli say the minisodes are geared toward Generation X and Y veterinarians and reflect the veterinary industry's demographic shift to young women working in suburban companion-animal practices.

All of the minisodes are available on YouTube at www.youtube.com/AmandaBrownDVM. Between minisodes, Amanda Brown, DVM, also interacts with fans through Facebook posts at www.generationvet.com and tweets at twitter.com/AmandaBrownDVM.

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