I wannabe a vet!

I wannabe a vet!

Theme park lets kids try out veterinary medicine.
source-image
May 01, 2008


False positive: Animatronic dogs at ­Wannado City look so real that kids ask if they're OK when the dogs go motionless. (COURTESY OF MERIAL.)
There's a dog on a surgical table and another on an exam room table—just like at your hospital. The difference is that these dogs aren't powered by blood but electricity and state-of-the-art animatronic design. And the doctors checking their vitals are way too young to be in veterinary school.

This is Wannado City in Sunrise, Fla., where children can try their hand at more than 200 occupations, including television director, police chief, dance club DJ, archaeologist, and, yes, animal doctor. Once visitors get their hands on them, the animatronic dogs respond with vocal noises and wagging tails, and kids are asked to get to the bottom of what's ailing the sick dog on the surgery table. Could it be ... something Sparky ate? Hint: Yes. (Merial is the sponsor for the veterinary clinic portion of the park.)

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