I love being a veterinarian ... most of the time

I love being a veterinarian ... most of the time

Most of you love veterinary medicine. For those of you struggling, here's the proof you're not alone—and some inspiration and advice to brighten your outlook.
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Aug 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff


Which statement best describes your feelings about your current job?
It's a good time to be a veterinarian. The quality of medicine is always improving, wellness care is making pets healthier, and your clients respect your work. "I'm so in awe of the human-animal bond that's always been there but now is out of the closet," says Dr. Ross Clark, Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member. You tend to agree (see the charts on this page). Clients are holding their pets closer to their hearts, making them family members entitled to compassionate, high-quality medical care. And you're providing it.


Past, present, and future
But sometimes, when you feel down, it might seem that veterinary practice just gets harder and harder. You also seem to feel that on a bad day, being a veterinarian is less like a bed of roses and more like a bucket of moldy dog biscuits. Consider the following numbers to be the statistical recognition that you're not alone: Veterinarians like you love their career but struggle with it, trying to balance compassionate care, home life, and business realities every day.


How would you rate your happiness compared to five years ago?

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