How to keep family from driving you crazy during the holidays

How to keep family from driving you crazy during the holidays

These tips will help you better enjoy your time with extended family.
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Dec 18, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

You've pretty much figured out how to get along with your practice family, and now it's time for the holiday break. But sometimes the holidays with your real family can be just as stressful. Here are a few tips on making the holidays with your family a happy and enjoyable time, compiled by the faculty at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario.

1. Don't expect everything to be perfect. It's highly likely that not everyone will be on their best behavior, so be prepared, and you won't be disappointed.

2. Keep difficult topics to yourself. Holiday gatherings are not the place to address major issues in the family such as divorce, relocation, or family conflicts. If such issues need to be raised, it's best to do so well before or after the holidays. And if one of your relatives does raise an uncomfortable topic, say something like, "Can we talk about this later? I don’t think this is the best time."

3. Avoid alcohol overload. A little social drinking is fine, but don't drink too much, or you may end up saying something you regret later on.

4. Don't forget yourself. It's easy to get caught up in making sure everyone else is happy—you may forget that this is your chance to enjoy yourself as well. Be sure to work in exercise, plenty of sleep, and time with those who support and sustain you.

For more holiday tips, visit Ryerson University’s Web site.

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