How to fix your fees, spot a great deal on a practice, and more

How to fix your fees, spot a great deal on a practice, and more

Progress in Practice seminars to unveil new benchmark data, new tips before purchasing a practice.
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Jun 16, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

The Progress in Practice seminars Aug. 27 to 28 cover everything owners—and potential owners—need to know to pick a practice to buy and make their current practices profitable.

Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, will show you why doing your homework before you buy can significantly increase your odds of success. You’ll learn to:

> Evaluate a hospital during a visit
> Size up the current team members and figure out how likely they are to stay when you’re the boss
> Compare the practice’s clients and how they compare to your target clients
> Appraise equipment to find out what needs repair or replacement.

Denise Tumblin, CPA, will unveil the latest Benchmarks 2009: A Study of Well-Managed Practices and take you on an interactive journey through your practice finances compared with the finances of top-performing hospitals nationwide. You’ll learn to secure your fee structure, closely track revenue and expenses, and keep employee compensation competitive without breaking the bank. You bring your financial documents, and Tumblin supplies the laptops and worksheets for a step-by-step walk through your practice’s present and future.

Get the early bird rate of $499 for each seminar if you register by July 22. Receive a special combo rate when you register for a Progress in Practice seminar and one or more days of CVC Kansas City.

Visit TheCVC.com for more details, and see Related Links below for more content right now on Benchmarks and practice buying.

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