How exercise can make your veterinary team members more productive

How exercise can make your veterinary team members more productive

As a veterinary practice owner, you're always looking for ways to run a more efficient clinic. Instituting an exercise program may help you do just that.
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Oct 28, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

Giving your veterinary team members time to exercise during the day may lead to increased productivity—despite the reduction in work hours, according to a new study in the August Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

In the study, one group of employees at a large Swedish public dental health organization was assigned to a mandatory exercise program carried out during regular work hours: 2.5 hours per week. A second group received the same reduction in work hours, but did not participate in an exercise program. A third group worked regular hours with no exercise program.

Employees assigned to the exercise program had significant increases in self-rated measures of productivity: They felt more productive while on the job and had a reduced rate of work absences due to illness. The results suggest that reducing work hours for exercise or other health promotion doesn’t necessarily lead to decreased productivity—and may even lead to increased productivity.

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