How to develop strong leaders in your veterinary practice

How to develop strong leaders in your veterinary practice

Look for a strong associate on your veterinary staff—and be prepared to dole out a little tough love.
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Nov 14, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

As a veterinary practice owner, it’s important to create a succession plan, which means you’ll need to develop strong leaders in your practice today. A first-of-its-kind study may contain the key to doing so. In a field experiment, researchers found that pairing a seasoned pro with a promising prospect in an informal mentorship relationship was significantly more potent in developing strong leaders than formal group training.

The process, however, was effective only if the protégés fully trusted their mentor and were willing to handle brunt criticism, not just empty praise. The findings, which will appear in the journal Academy of Management Learning and Education, reinforce the notion that employers can move away from one-size-fits-all training and toward one-on-one mentorships characterized by trust.

Do you have potential practice owners working on your veterinary team? If so, do you have a plan to help develop them into leaders? See the related links below for more tips.

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