House call compensation

House call compensation

source-image
Mar 01, 2008

I'm a house call veterinarian who'd like to continue to perform surgeries and take radiographs in order to maintain my skills. What's the appropriate amount of compensation for a veterinarian who allows me to use his or her hospital for these purposes?


Mark Opperman
Most practices separate their hospital costs from their professional costs, says Veterinary Economics Hospital Management Editor Mark Opperman, CVPM, owner of VMC Inc., a consulting firm in Evergreen, Colo. And that's where you start your negotiations.

For example, the charge for a radiograph might be $125, but $25 of that fee is for interpretation. The remainder pays for taking and processing the radiograph. In this case, if you took a radiograph for your client in a colleague's hospital, Opperman says, you'd earn $25 and the practice would retain $100. The same applies to surgery. Usually a practice would charge a surgeon's fee along with fees for inhalation anesthesia, hospitalization, operating room use, and so on. You'd be entitled to the surgeon's fee, and the practice would keep the rest of the income for the hospital services provided. This makes for a fair and equitable distribution of fees when an outside veterinarian uses another hospital's facilities, Opperman says.

Hot topics on dvm360

Dog of Dallas Ebola patient will not be euthanized, authorities say

Health officials have quarantined and will monitor dog and amid concerns surrounding deadly virus.

Video: How to perform a belt-loop gastropexy

Prevent GDV in your at-risk patients with this simple technique.

Stretch your skills to earn more in veterinary practice

Finding new tasks could be the key to generating more income for your practice—and boosting your pay.

Veterinary community stunned by Sophia Yin's unexpected death

Prominent veterinary behaviorist died of suicide Sept. 28.

Study shows sustained salary slump for veterinary support staff

Since 2009, technicians paid by the hour have experienced a bump in pay, but pay for other team members has stayed stagnant, according to data from the 2014 Firstline Career Path Study. Here’s a look at changes in team pay from 2009 to 2013.